June 5, 2017 Barbara

Tile & Stone: The Good, the Bad and the Gorgeous!

 

Tile & Stone: The Good, the Bad and the Gorgeous!

Let’s start with The Good- Porcelain Tile. Good because, as you can see from the pictures above, it has many different faces. Porcelain tile can look like wood planking, or it can look hand-painted and sometimes it looks exactly like brick. There are thousands of different looks, styles, and finishes of tile in porcelain. It is an excellent product because of it’s strength and ease of maintenance. Floors, especially, take a beating from all the sand we bring in, or is blown in by the wind! Porcelain is dense enough to withstand the scratching of sand. If beauty, durability and easy maintenance are high on your priority list, take a look at porcelain products. They never disappoint.

 

Tile & Stone: The Good, the Bad and the Gorgeous!

The Bad? Ceramic Tile. Really, this product is only bad when it is improperly used. For example, it is absolutely perfect for shower walls and backsplashes. Neither of those two areas need a dense material, as walls don’t take the abuse that floors do. Ceramic tile will chip and crack easier than a porcelain tile. Often, the under laying clay can be a contrasting color, making the chip even more noticeable. For that reason, I do not recommend using it as flooring material. Even in a bathroom, I would still rather use a porcelain on the floor, plus porcelain can have a more slip-resistant finish, making it a safer choice.

 

 

 

Tile & Stone: The Good, the Bad and the Gorgeous!

 

 

Now, the Gorgeous, Stone. I love natural stone, so I may be a little partial here. There is something very special, to me, in the inherent differences between each piece of stone. I love the beauty in the fact that no two pieces are exactly the same. Now, this can drive other people crazy. Any type of stone that has a lot of color and movement through it does have a tendency to look busy. You have to be careful when deciding on a rug, for instance. Whatever sits on top of an active, patterned floor needs to calming. Also, not everyone is cut out for the high maintenance and expense of natural stone.

Travertine, as seen in the first photo, can be calm in its coloring, or it can have a lot of movement and color. It is one of the softer stones, so care must be taken to protect it from sand. Just a little sand under the leg of a sofa, for instance, could cause a noticeable scratch if the furniture is not properly lifted when moved. Travertine has a casual, worn look about it and works well as flooring, shower walls and backsplash material. This stone must be periodically sealed.

Granite, the middle photo, is much more durable than travertine. It can be cut into slabs, as shown, or into more manageable sizes for floor applications. There are hundreds of different types of granite. Some are sedate and others are wild in their colors and patterning. Of course, the more rare = the more expensive. Granite is a perfect countertop material. It does not require a lot of maintenance and adds value to your home. Once, again, care must be taken with sand and natural stone flooring.

Last, but not least, marble. Not as durable as granite, marble has a unique beauty in its’ veining. Used for centuries, marble has an elegance to it. Available in a multitude of colors, marble makes a “wow” entry when used in a medallion, as shown above. Also, black and white checkered marble floors have been popular in some parts of the country for years. They look especially great in older homes. Marble makes a wonderful bathroom countertop material. Bathroom counters do not generally get the use ( or abuse ) that kitchen counters do. It will stain, however, if make-up or nail polish is left on it. Marble should be re-sealed every so often, depending on the amount of use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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